theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

kateoplis:

NYC’s “first drinking fountains were installed after the Croton Aqueduct began bringing down fresh water from north of the city in the 1840s.

Touring the fountains, you can sip a bit of New York history.

The 1888 Temperance Fountain in Tompkins Square Park was a gift from a doctor who hoped it would encourage residents to drink less alcohol. 

fountain in Union Square from 1881 features a woman with a baby and a child to remind New Yorkers of the virtues of charity. And the 1992 Friedel Memorial Drinking Fountain in Central Park features the likeness of a beloved dog.”

“New York City tap water is healthy, affordable and safe. We perform more than half a million tests a year to confirm that.”

Plumbers are fine-tuning more than 3,100 fountains in NYC this month - by May, they’ll all be spouting.

museumuesum:

Peter Fischli & David Weiss

The Equilibres

Outlaws, 1984, C-print, 13 x 9 1/4 inches

Afternoons Nap, 1986, gelatin silver print, 9 1/4 x 13 inches

Monument, 1984, C-print, 9 1/4 x 13 inches;

International Style, 1984, C-print, 13 x 9 1/4 inches

The Secret of the Pyramids, 1986, C-print, 13 x 9 1/4 inches

Honor, Courage, Confidence, 1984, gelatin silver print, 13 x 9 1/4 inches

As Far As It Goes, 1986, C-print, 13 3/4 x 10 1/4 inches

Quiet Afternoon, 1984, C-print, 13 x 9 1/4 inches

Ben Hur, 1984, gelatin silver print, 9 1/4 x 13 inches

Speaking Tuesday night in Brooklyn, blocks away from his company headquarters and his father’s apartment, Spike Lee went off on how the neighborhood has changed. The filmmaker, wearing a Knicks beanie, orange socks, blue Nikes, and “Defend Brooklyn” hoodie, was at Pratt Institute for a lecture in honor of African American History Month, surrounded by locals, when he was nearly asked a question about “the other side” of the gentrification debate. “Let me just kill you right now,” Lee interrupted, “because there was some bullshit article in the New York Times saying ‘the good of gentrification.’” (See: “Argument Over a Brownstone Neighborhood” and New York’s “Is Gentrification All Bad?”)

“I don’t believe that,” said Lee. And for the next seven minutes he explained, with passion, humor, and a fair amount of f-words.
Here’s the thing: I grew up here in Fort Greene. I grew up here in New York. It’s changed. And why does it take an influx of white New Yorkers in the south Bronx, in Harlem, in Bed Stuy, in Crown Heights for the facilities to get better? The garbage wasn’t picked up every motherfuckin’ day when I was living in 165 Washington Park. P.S. 20 was not good. P.S. 11. Rothschild 294. The police weren’t around. When you see white mothers pushing their babies in strollers, three o’clock in the morning on 125th Street, that must tell you something.
[Audience member: And I don’t dispute that … ]
Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. And even more. Let me kill you some more.
[Audience member: Can I talk about something?]
Not yet.
Then comes the motherfuckin’ Christopher Columbus Syndrome. You can’t discover this! We been here. You just can’t come and bogart. There were brothers playing motherfuckin’ African drums in Mount Morris Park for 40 years and now they can’t do it anymore because the new inhabitants said the drums are loud. My father’s a great jazz musician. He bought a house in nineteen-motherfuckin’-sixty-eight, and the motherfuckin’ people moved in last year and called the cops on my father. He’s not — he doesn’t even play electric bass! It’s acoustic! We bought the motherfuckin’ house in nineteen-sixty-motherfuckin’-eight and now you call the cops? In 2013? Get the fuck outta here!
Nah. You can’t do that. You can’t just come in the neighborhood and start bogarting and say, like you’re motherfuckin’ Columbus and kill off the Native Americans. Or what they do in Brazil, what they did to the indigenous people. You have to come with respect. There’s a code. There’s people.
You can’t just — here’s another thing: When Michael Jackson died they wanted to have a party for him in motherfuckin’ Fort Greene Park and all of a sudden the white people in Fort Greene said, “Wait a minute! We can’t have black people having a party for Michael Jackson to celebrate his life. Who’s coming to the neighborhood? They’re gonna leave lots of garbage.” Garbage? Have you seen Fort Greene Park in the morning? It’s like the motherfuckin’ Westminster Dog Show. There’s 20,000 dogs running around. Whoa. So we had to move it to Prospect Park!
I mean, they just move in the neighborhood. You just can’t come in the neighborhood. I’m for democracy and letting everybody live but you gotta have some respect. You can’t just come in when people have a culture that’s been laid down for generations and you come in and now shit gotta change because you’re here? Get the fuck outta here. Can’t do that!
And then! [to audience member] Whoa whoa whoa. And then! So you’re talking about the people’s property change? But what about the people who are renting? They can’t afford it anymore! You can’t afford it. People want live in Fort Greene. People wanna live in Clinton Hill. The Lower East Side, they move to Williamsburg, they can’t even afford fuckin’, motherfuckin’ Williamsburg now because of motherfuckin’ hipsters. What do they call Bushwick now? What’s the word? [Audience: East Williamsburg]
That’s another thing: Motherfuckin’… These real estate motherfuckers are changing names! Stuyvestant Heights? 110th to 125th, there’s another name for Harlem. What is it? What? What is it? No, no, not Morningside Heights. There’s a new one. [Audience: SpaHa] What the fuck is that? How you changin’ names?
And we had the crystal ball, motherfuckin’ Do the Right Thing with John Savage’s character, when he rolled his bike over Buggin’ Out’s sneaker. I wrote that script in 1988. He was the first one. How you walking around Brooklyn with a Larry Bird jersey on? You can’t do that. Not in Bed Stuy.
So, look, you might say, “Well, there’s more police protection. The public schools are better.” Why are the public schools better? First of all, everybody can’t afford — even if you have money it’s still hard to get your kids into private school. Everybody wants to go to Saint Ann’s — you can’t get into Saint Ann’s. You can’t get into Friends. What’s the other one? In Brooklyn Heights. Packer. If you can’t get your child into there … It’s crazy. There’s a business now where people — you pay — people don’t even have kids yet and they’re taking this course about how to get your kid into private school. I’m not lying! If you can’t get your kid into private school and you’re white here, what’s the next best thing? All right, now we’re gonna go to public schools.
So, why did it take this great influx of white people to get the schools better? Why’s there more police protection in Bed Stuy and Harlem now? Why’s the garbage getting picked up more regularly? We been here!
All right, go ahead. Let’s see you come back to that.

Here’s the full audio, including the man’s response and Lee’s rebuttal: (Posted in the link)

kateoplis:

newsweek:

Hello. Good day.
This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”
But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.
The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!
For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.
This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.
Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.
The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you. (This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is)

Dear Newsweek,
Could you kindly place quote marks/blocks around the content you are “quoting” from other publications, in this case, the great Mother Jones? Sourcing it in parenthesis does not adequately reflect that you in fact, did not write it. 
Best, Kate
EDIT: I did send a fan mail to Newsweek about this earlier, to which I received this head-scratcher: 
"The plugin we’ve been using lately doesn’t allow for that but we do edit them in when requested."
Well, being “Newsweek” with all that it entails, I think you probably should be “editing” it 100% of the time, to ensure proper attribution, instead of excusing it as a “plugin” issue and only doing the right thing by request. No?
Newsweek: "Honestly it depends on the post, the author and the contributor. We post approximately 20x a day, some of which are sourced in the way you’d like, some which aren’t."
In all fairness, they have updated this post in blockquotes AND added MotherJones to the link. But.
What say you, Tumblr? Do we not expect Newsweek to place quotes around content it’s quoting from another publication, every. single. time? Or should their readership be satisfied that “some” are sourced in the way we’d like? Is it merely a matter of “taste,” this attribution bizwax? 

kateoplis:

newsweek:

Hello. Good day.

This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”

But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.

The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!

For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.

This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.

Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.

The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you. (This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is)

Dear Newsweek,

Could you kindly place quote marks/blocks around the content you are “quoting” from other publications, in this case, the great Mother Jones? Sourcing it in parenthesis does not adequately reflect that you in fact, did not write it. 

Best, Kate

EDIT: I did send a fan mail to Newsweek about this earlier, to which I received this head-scratcher: 

"The plugin we’ve been using lately doesn’t allow for that but we do edit them in when requested."

Well, being “Newsweek” with all that it entails, I think you probably should be “editing” it 100% of the time, to ensure proper attribution, instead of excusing it as a “plugin” issue and only doing the right thing by request. No?

Newsweek: "Honestly it depends on the post, the author and the contributor. We post approximately 20x a day, some of which are sourced in the way you’d like, some which aren’t."

In all fairness, they have updated this post in blockquotes AND added MotherJones to the link. But.

What say you, Tumblr? Do we not expect Newsweek to place quotes around content it’s quoting from another publication, every. single. time? Or should their readership be satisfied that “some” are sourced in the way we’d like? Is it merely a matter of “taste,” this attribution bizwax? 

Without passion, all the skill in the world won’t lift you above craft. Without skill, all the passion in the world will leave you eager but floundering. Combining the two is the essence of the creative life.
-Twyla Tharp, The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life (via mayshi)

Loved this book, love this quote.

kateoplis:

Marrakesh’s women bikers in Hassan Hajjaj’s Kesh Angels

kateoplis:

Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

I have a range of thoughts about gentrification daily while being apart of it in this culturally rich neighborhood. Wonderful photos capture a community of people with roots here.

jennilee:

(via 50 magazines to buy before you die)

5centsapound:

Photographers: Iranian Living Room

Mohammad Mahdi Amya, Majid Farahani, Saina Golzar, Sanaz Hajikhani, Hamed Ilkhan, Ali Kaveh, Mahshid Mahboubifar, Mehdi Moradpour, Sahar Pishsaraeian, Negar Sadehvandi, Hashem Shakeri, Sina Shiri, Morteza Soorani, Nazanin Tabatabaei Yazdi, Ali Tajik

Under the creative direction of Enrico Bossan, head of photography at Fabrica, 15 young Iranian photographers welcome us into the “Iranian Living Room”, a unique space beyond global media and local state. This is where life is lived in private in Iran; it is often where life takes place, in fact.

In this living room both literal and metaphorical, we are privileged to discover multiple interpretations of Iranian reality: cultural differences and similarities, solitude and conviviality, relaxation and excitement, dressing up for an interior life versus dressing up for the street, the rhythms of religious ceremony and the patterns of everyday life.

Where much life on the street is presented by the world’s media as foreign and inhibited, behind these closed doors the lens captures a life that is immediately recognisable in all its untrammelled richness. It takes on a central role as a kind of counterpoint to the contested street, functioning as a new public sphere. It is both far away and close to home. These vignettes are framed by young photographers who, through their own storytelling, might help change the stories told about Iran.

Iranian Living Room is the first of a series of editorial projects self-published by Fabrica. - burn magazine